Campbell County Fire Dept.

Greetings from the Chief,

Welcome to the Campbell County Fire Department (CCFD) website. As you explore our webpage, I think you will gain a better understanding of our organization and the services we provide. The Campbell County Fire Department is governed by a “Joint Powers Fire Board”

representing the City of Gillette, the Town of Wright, and Campbell County. Our service area encompasses nearly 5,000 square miles and is situated in Northeastern Wyoming. Our county produces roughly 30% of the nations coal supply from our open pit mines as well as significant amounts of natural gas, oil, and cattle. With all of these industries, our fire department faces a wide array of emergency responses.

CCFD is a combination fire department consisting of 29 career and more than 150 volunteer firefighters. Exceeding 80 pieces of apparatus and support vehicles, our department utilizes a variety of units to support our mission in Campbell County. We provide fire, rescue, EMS, and hazardous materials response services to approximately 50,000 citizens. Our volunteers provide county wide coverage from ten stations and eleven wildland support stations. The career staff runs 24-hour coverage out of Fire Station 1, as well as augment the other volunteer stations on their days off. Our combination system offers the citizens of Campbell County a variety of firefighting and technical expertise by combining the professional disciplines of our volunteers and the firefighting experience of our system as a whole.

I hope you enjoy your visit to the CCFD website. Please use the “Contact Us” link if you should have any questions or comments about our organization.

Ron Smith, Interim Fire Chief 
Campbell County Fire Department


Forced Entry Bronze Statue

Forced Entry” statue at Fire Station 1

As part of the Mayors Art Council - 2015 Avenue of Arts program, CCFD was fortunate to have one of the pieces of art placed at Fire Station 1.    The piece is titled “Forced Entry."  The Mayors Art Council first saw Austin Weishel at an art show in Loveland. He was displaying one of his smaller works. The Mayors Art Council had contacted him and asked if he could make a life size piece and enter it in in the 2015 Avenue of Arts Program.

The Fire Department is honored to have a great statue here and we want to hang onto it. Forced Entry is consigned here for one year (until June 2016), unless we can come up with the necessary funds to obtain this statue.

The total Cost of this statue is $59,500. The Mayor’s Art Council waved the 25% ($14,625) fee if we are able to come up with the funds by next June. The Volunteers collected $3,400 from the annual July 4 Pancake Feed which they are contributing to the purchase of this statue. The remaining funding that the department needs to raise is approximately $41,475.00.


The Fire department has formed a committee to get the ball rolling. Committee members are Everett Boss, Angel Rogge, Jerrica Johnson, Nikki Nellermoe, Rod Warne, Mike Ratcliff, and Donna Crippen.

This committee has come up with several fund raising ideas. Some of these ideas include the Fire Department will release their very own cookbook, a2016 Calendar, and T-shirts. The committee will also have several donation boxes distributed in the community (City of Gillette, Chamber of Commerce, and at Fire Station #1). We will keep trying to come up with more ideas and times go by.

With major donations we will have sponsorship plaques surrounding the statue. For names placement on the Lieutenant Plaque donations will be from $250-$499; names on the Captain’s Plaque will be $500-$999; and for the amounts above $1000 there will be a Chief’s Plaque.


About the sculptor – Austin Weishel

Austin discovered sculpting after visiting his grandparents in Arizona, where they took him on a tour of a local bronze foundry. There, he was introduced to the process of casting clay sculptures into bronze. The owner of Bronze Smith, Ed Reilly, challenged Austin to make something out of a ball of clay. Reilly told him if it was any good, he would cast it in bronze. Intrigued and inspired, Austin took the clay home to Colorado and began his first sculpture.

After several months, he returned to Arizona with a finished clay sculpture of a fireman. Impressed with the sculpture, Reilly cast it in bronze and offered him a summer apprenticeship. After apprenticeship, Austin chose sculpting as a career.

Austin decided to sculpt first responders due to his interest in the police and fire services. In high school, he worked as a student firefighter for the Loveland Fire Department for nearly three years; he subsequently joined Loveland’s student police program. At 18 years of age, he successfully completed one of Colorado’s fire academies to become a firefighter. Soon after, Austin was a certified Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) and continues to sculpt the fire services.

His transformation from small pieces to life-size works garnered his first commission with the Windsor-Severance Fire Protection District. At 19 years old, he sculpted a life-size fireman, named “Follow Your Heart."

Today, he continues to combine his two passions for art and public service. His latest project, the National Fire Dog Memorial named “Ashes to Answers,” is a life-size fireman with an arson K-9. “Ashes to Answers” is located at Fire Station #2 in downtown Washington D.C. “Ashes to Answers” was commissioned by Jerry Means, an arson investigative agent with the Colorado Bureau of Investigations (CBI).


If you wish, please send your donations to:

Campbell County Fire Department
106 Rohan Avenue
Gillette, WY 82716

Click this link below to view a picture of the bronze statue, "Forced Entry":



Search for news stories :

Select Year Select Month
Select Category Enter Keyword